Trinetra Ganesh Temple in Ranthambore

It is said that; in 1299 AD, there was a war between King Hammeer and Alauddin Khilji. During the time of war they filled there godowns with foods and all the necessary things in Ranthambhore Fort, where King resides. Since the war lasted for several years, the stock in godowns were over. One night when King Hammer; who was a great devotee to God Ganesh, was sleeping, he dreamed that Lord Ganesh came to him and said that by tomorrow morning all the problems and lacking would be over. In the morning an idol of Lord Ganesh with three eyes*(Trinetra), was found embossed from one of the fort’s wall. As a miracle the war was over and the godowns were full. In 1300 AD King Hammer built a temple of Lord Ganesh and placed Riddhi Siddhi, his wife and two sons Shub Labh along with the idol of Ganesh. His vehicle mushak (mouse) is also placed there.

The temple situated on the palace of Ranthambore fort about 12 kms from Sawai Madhopur.

Ganesh Chaturthi holds a special place in Ranthambore and is celebrated to commemorate the origin of Lord Ganesh, who is said to have been born on this day. The Ganesha temple in the fort of Ranthambore is one of the most eminent Ganesha temples of Rajasthan.

On this day, thousands of devotees visit the temple. There are songs and ‘bhajans’ praising Lord Ganesha. The area has its own share of markets where you can find general merchandise and small trinkets to shop for.

The Ranthambhore fort, in turn, is said to have got its name from two adjoining hills – Rann and Thambhore. It lies on the Thambhore hill, overlooking the Rann and offers some breathtaking views of the Park.

The walls of the fort are about 7 kilometers in length and include an area of nearly 4 square kilometers. All around the fort, one can see many old ruins, including palaces, temples, cenotaphs, step-wells and houses.

The Ranthambore fort is surrounded by massive stonewalls which are strengthened by towers and bastions. The stone for the masonry was mined from inside the Fort and the mines were later turned into ponds for water storage.

The main approach to the Fort lies through a narrow valley, which had four fortified gateways. Of these, only the first gate – Misradhara gate, is still standing. There are many ruined buildings inside the Fort, with Hammir’s Court, Badal Mahal, Dhula Mahal and Phansi Ghar being the most prominent of them. The Fort also has many cenotaphs, temples and gates.

The Ganesh Temple, which lies very close to the main entry gate to the Fort, attracts a steady flow of pilgrims, mainly from the rural hinterland. During the annual Ganesh festival, tens of thousands of pilgrims visit the temple, from all over the country.

Most of the visitors to the Fort tend to stay in the Western part of the Fort. Very few visitors go to the eastern part of the fort, which is nearly wild. A small perennial stream called Gupt Ganga flows in this part of the Fort. Here one can see a large number of birds, Langurs, the odd small cat and sometimes, even leopards. The fort is one of the best places to look for the very rare and elusive Fishing cat.

The fort is a must see for all visitors to Ranthambhore. A good day to visit the fort is Wednesday, the day of the Lord Ganesh, when a lot of local people visit the Ganesh temple dressed in their best finery.

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About Admin

Vikram is an experienced communications professional with over 17 years of expertise in growing, managing and defending leading brands’ reputation across industry sectors in traditional media and digital environments. With his strong background in media and integrated communications, he drives impactful communications strategies that contribute to a company’s strategic objectives. He has held key positions at Tata Housing, Adfactors PR, Sampark PR, The Resort and Indian Express Group. He also had his share of entrepreneurial experience of publishing and editing a maritime weekly – Shipping Today for over 7 years. Vikram has managed corporate, crisis and product PR and has actively interacted with almost every type of media across the length and breadth of our country. He has managed communications campaigns for large and mid-size companies in B2B & B2C space, across sectors such as Technology, Education, Real Estate, Infrastructure, Shipping, Logistics, Finance, Media etc. He has counseled at the highest levels as well as sorted things out at street level for top brands including Tata Housing, Aptech, 3i Infotech, Oracle Financial Services Software, BMC Software, Rolta India, ICICI Prudential Life Insurance, ICICI Lombard General Insurance, Bharati Shipyard, Mumbai SEZ, Ybrant Digital and many more. Vikram enjoys wide industry recognition as an expert on emerging media technologies and public relations. Vikram writes extensively on PR, social media, marketing and branding. A prolific blogger since 2004; his blog, Vikypedia.in is India’s most read PR blog. Most notably he has also founded Indian PR Forum, India’s largest online forum of PR professionals. He is passionate about sharing his knowledge on PR and Social media through lectures at various communications institutes across India and by also speaking at various industry forums, events & seminars. Vikram holds a Master’s & Bachelor’s degrees in Journalism and Mass Communications. He has been honored with Y Imagine Excellence Award - “Best Young PR Professional of Year 2011” by Young India Communicators Forum (YICOF), Hyderabad, 5 individual awards at Tata Housing and 2 awards at The Resort for various communications related initiatives. His interests include his family, photography, travelling, of course, blogging. Vikram can be reached via email at pr .vikram@gmail.com or on social hubs like About.me, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Posted on July 11, 2012, in Ganesha Shrines in Rajasthan and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Subramaniam Ramamoorthy

    I have been writing articles in Tamil and English on Hindu temples and hindu festivals. I shall contribute something on rare Ganesh temples in Tamil Nadu

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